Great Ghost Rescue

This was my pick for my Halloween read this year. Eva Ibbotson’s books (at least the couple I’ve read so far) feature witches and ghosts and ghouls with their stinks and spells, smells and sometimes even ‘bloody’ inclinations, but still remain light-hearted, fun reads, rather than ‘horror’ fiction. Most of them (the ghosts, I mean) are rather likeable, much more so than some humans. The Great Ghost Rescue was no different, and yet perhaps a more serious themed book than the others I’ve read by her. In this one, somewhat like the last one I read (Dial-a-Ghost), a family of ghosts find themselves homeless after many centuries, for modern humans can never seem to leave any place alone, or any one (human, animal, or ghost) to live their lives in peace, covering everything with concrete, noise, and garbage, and destroying any bit of nature they can lay their hands on. But luckily for this family, headed by the Gliding Kilt and his wife, the Hag, they meet a little boy at his school, Rick, who empathises with his fellow creatures and sets out to help them get a sanctuary for ghosts. Soon news of their ‘mission’ spreads all over, and various ghosts and other creatures begin to join them. The youngest of the ghost family, Humphrey is called Humphrey the Horrible, but is anything but horrible. But when their path to securing their sanctuary turns out to be riddled with far more danger than they had anticipated, it is Humphrey who has to act, to save his family, the other ghosts, and himself. (The actual story is somewhat different from the synopsis at the back of the book based on which I’d written about this book here.)

 

This was once again a fun read but much more than just an adventure story with ghosts. The author, as I read from her bio had moved to England from Vienna, from where her family had to flee during the Nazi regime, and this book certainly reflects those experiences. There are places where she expressly talks about people who are not wanted because they are different, but really the whole book is about that as well—that everyone, animal, human, even ghost or vampire-bat is entitled to a place where they can live securely and happily. These creatures may be different but perhaps the real horror is caused by humans who seem to keep destroying everything, animals’ habitats, food sources, open spaces, and then target the animals for whatever they do in their desperation; target those who are ‘different’ just for being so. Another point that stands out is how we judge others so readily, yet rarely evaluate our own actions.

 

But I am making it sound all serious—while these themes are indeed what stand out, this is also an adventure story, where there are ghosts of various sorts in need of a home, a perilous journey to be made to find that home and even a villain to be defeated to finally achieve it, and this book has all those elements and also some touches of humour.

 

Though more serious than what I had in mind for Halloween, this was still an enjoyable and fun read!

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7 thoughts on “Halloween Read: The Great Ghost Rescue

    1. Er… I think I take my my other comment. Thinking back to Dial-a-Ghost I realise these themes do come in there as well. It is the war that makes the ghost family ghosts, and once again the issue is finding a safe haven for them, even though the ‘villains’ target them for different reasons (not because of the ghosts themselves).

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Martie 🙂 And thanks for sharing your link.

      Sorry that it didn’t turn out like you remembered it. One does end up noticing things that are not so PC about old reads even favourites which make them less than perfect now.

      Liked by 1 person

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