Book Review: Ghost by Lubov Lenova

My thanks to Booktasters for a review copy of this one. Ghost is a murder mystery set in a fantasy world. In this world, all children manifest magical gifts (like the ability to produce fire, to read minds, or more rarely, to turn time or heal others) around the age of fifteen. The gifts can…

Book Review: Ariadne by Jennifer Saint

My thanks to Headline and NetGalley for a review copy of this one. I can’t quite remember when I first heard of the minotaur and the labyrinth in Crete—it was either in my school English book (class 5?) which had the story of Theseus killing the minotaur, and finding his way out of the labyrinth…

Shelf Control #137: English Eccentrics by Edith Sitwell

Wednesday, the 28th of April, and time for Shelf Control once again! Shelf Control is a weekly feature hosted by Lisa at Bookshelf Fantasies, and celebrates the books waiting to be read on your TBR piles/mountains. To participate, simply pick a book from your TBR pile, and write a post about it--what its about, why…

Book Review: Lonely Castle in the Mirror by Mizuki Tsujimura

My thanks to Ruth Richardson and Doubleday/Random House UK for a review copy of this one via NetGalley. This was in some ways a strange read, rather hard to classify and yet one I ended up enjoying very much. Our story opens with Kokoro Anzai, a teen who has just started junior high but who…

Shelf Control #136: Bats in the Belfry by E.C.R. Lorac

Wednesday, the 21st of April, and time for Shelf Control once again! Shelf Control is a weekly feature hosted by Lisa at Bookshelf Fantasies, and celebrates the books waiting to be read on your TBR piles/mountains. To participate, all you do is pick a book from your TBR pile, and write a post about it--what…

Book Review: Flowers for the Judge by Margery Alingham #1936Club

This is my rather last minute contribution for the #1936Club hosted by Karen at Kaggsy’s Bookish Ramblings (here) and Simon at Stuck in a Book (here). Flowers for the Judge first published in 1936 is the seventh of the Albert Campion mysteries, but my first time reading one. Our story is set around a family-run…

Book Review: The Light of the Midnight Stars by Rena Rossner

My thanks to Orbit/Little, Brown Book Co and NetGalley for a review copy of this one. This, like the author’s previous book The Sisters of the Winter Wood combines history, fantasy, Jewish folklore, and fairy tales (the previous book didn’t have a fairy tale but Christina Rossetti’s Gobin Market as its base). In 14th-century Hungary,…