Book Review: Ti Amo by Hanne Ørstavik and translated by Martin Aitken #NovNov

My thanks to Archipelago/Steerforth Press for a review copy of this book via Edelweiss. Ti Amo (2022) is a raw, honest, beautiful, heart-breaking, autobiographical account of a woman whose husband is suffering terminal cancer. Written originally in Norwegian by author Hanne Ørstavik, the version I read is translated brilliantly by Martin Aitken. In Ti Amo,…

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Book Review: Montaigne by Stefan Zweig and translated by Will Stone #NovNov #NonfictionNovember #GermanLitMonth

In such epochs where the highest values of life—our peace, our independence, our basic rights, all that makes our existence more pure, more beautiful, all that justifies it—are sacrificed to the demon inhabiting a dozen fanatics and ideologues, all the problems of the man who fears for his humanity come down to the same question:…

Book Review: Father Goose by William Lishman

I had received Father Goose (1995) by William Lishman as a present many years ago, but despite it being about a rather interesting person and subject, I never somehow got down to reading it. But this year, having added it to my #10BooksofSummer list, I finally did. Father Goose is an autobiographical account of William…

Book Review: Attendant Lords: Bairam Khan and Abdur Rahim: Courtiers & Poets in Mughal India by T.C.A. Raghavan

Taking its title from T.S. Eliot’s J. Alfred Prufrock, Attendant Lords: Bairam Khan and Abdur Rahim: Courtiers & Poets in Mughal India (2017), traces the stories of Bairam Khan (1501–1561) and his son Abdur Rahim (1556–1627), nobles of Persian ancestry who together served under the first four Mughal emperors and rose to high positions (both…

Book Review: Field Notes on Listening by Kit Dobson

My thanks to Wolsak & Wynn and Independent Publishers Group for a review copy of this book via Edelweiss. Field Notes on Listening is a reflection or rather, reflections on the connection we as a species have lost or perhaps broken, with the land, the environment around us, and even with each other, and on…

Book Review: A Good & Dignified Life: The Political Advice of Hannah Arendt & Rosa Luxemburg by Joke J. Hermsen and translated by Brendan Monaghan

My thanks to Yale University Press and NetGalley for a review copy of this book. Tumultuous is perhaps one word we might use to describe the world around us today, and one face of this is the citizens’ protests we are witnessing in numerous countries—West or East, ‘developed’ or ‘developing’. Looking at these protests, against,…

Book Review: The Flying Sikh by Stephen Barker

My thanks to Pen & Sword and NetGalley for a review copy of this book. ‘The Flying Sikh’ is an epithet we in India usually associate with athlete Milkha Singh, who won both Asian Games and Commonwealth golds, but this book is about a different ‘Flying Sikh’, the only Sikh airman to serve in the…

Book Review: Bookmarked: Middlemarch and the Imperfect Life by Pamela Erens

My thanks to Ig Publishing/Ingram Publisher Services and Edelweiss for a review copy of this book. Middlemarch and the Imperfect Life is part of the ‘Bookmarked’ series by Ig Publishing in which various authors reflect on different works of fiction and nonfiction that have impacted and inspired them in different ways. This is the first…

Book Review: Pirate Queens: The Lives of Anne Bonny and Mary Read by Rebecca Alexandra Simon

My thanks to Pen & Sword and NetGalley for a review copy of this book. Anne Bonny and Mary Read may not have been the only female pirates who operated in what is known as the Golden Age of Piracy (1650–1730; dates debated), but they were amongst the best known. From inspiring ballads and having…

Book Review: The Infernal World of Branwell Brontë by Daphne du Maurier #DDMReadingWeek

Having read (and enjoyed) a handful of novels by Daphne du Maurier, and last year, one collection of her short stories (here), I was keen to explore some of her non-fiction and so for #DDMReadingWeek hosted by Ali at Heavenali this year, I picked up a book that has on my radar for quite some…