Book Review: The Book of Form and Emptiness by Ruth Ozeki

My thanks to Canongate and Netgalley for a review copy of this book. The Book of Form and Emptiness is certainly a strange book, a story about loss and coping, about depression and mental illness, about friends and support systems, and of course, about books, for it is a book that tells us the story,…

Book Review: The Man Who Died Twice by Richard Osman

My thanks to Penguin UK and NetGalley for a review copy of this book. The Man Who Died Twice is the second book in the Thursday Murder Club (the Agatha Christie/Marple allusion just struck me when writing my review) series by Richard Osman. Set in a retirement village, Coopers Chase, the Thursday Murder Club comprises…

Book Review: Dr Wortle’s School by Anthony Trollope

Dr Wortle’s School (1881) is a standalone and the fortieth book written by Victorian author Anthony Trollope and focuses on themes of social propriety, gossip and justice, with an incidental thread of romance. Dr Wortle is the proprietor of a boys’ school which prepares students to go on to Eton and eventually Oxford. He is…

Book Review: Darkness Stabs by David Gunter

My thanks to the author, David Gunter and BookTasters for a review copy of the book. Darkness Stabs is the second part of the science-fiction/fantasy adventure Magical After which I had read some time earlier. The books (a four-book series, with each book in two parts) are set in Atsia Major and Atsia Minor which…

Book Review: Crooked House by Agatha Christie

There was a crooked man, and he walked a crooked mile…. And they all lived together in a little crooked house. Like Five Little Pigs; One, Two Buckle my Shoe (also published as The Patriotic Murders); and A Pocket Full of Rye, among many others Crooked House (1949), a standalone Christie novel too, takes inspiration…

Book Review: Wuhan by John Fletcher

My thanks to Head of Zeus and NetGalley for a review copy of this book. Wuhan is a novel of epic proportions set in the first year (1937‒1938) of the second Sino-Japanese war or Japanese invasion of China, when Wuhan (yes, the very same) served as the capital of the government headed by Chiang Kai-shek,…

Book Review: Steffan Green by Richmal Crompton

Steffan Green was my first foray into Richmal Crompton’s fiction for adults, and what a wonderful read it was. As the book opens, me meet Lettice Helston, a recently divorced thirty-eight-year-old woman—in fact, she has got the decree only the previous day. Lettice is driving down to the country, to her childhood friend Dorrie—but mostly,…

Book Review: Cat Flap by Alan S. Cowell

My thanks to Agora Books and NetGalley for a review copy of this book. Cat Flap is a slightly fantastical, quirky, humorous but also slightly over the top novel. Successful corporate executive, Dolores Tremayne, finds part of herself in her family’s cat, X (named so by her daughter, since it sounds ‘mysterious’) while her human…

Book Review: Wolf by Wolf by Ryan Graudin

My second ‘wolf’ themed book this week, and to my own surprise (or do I say shock), the second book from my own TBR pile (not NetGalley) that I’m reading in a month. Wolf by Wolf is a young adult book that I came across through YouTube/Booktube and was intrigued by its description—the plot itself…