Book Review: The Second Person from Porlock by Dennis Hamley

My thanks to NetGalley and Fairlight books for a review copy of this one. The Second Person from Porlock is a novel of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, of his life and relationships, and of his poetry (particularly Kubla Khan, the Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Christabel), and also of two young men who embark on…

Book Review: Measuring the World by Daniel Kehlmann #GermanLitMonth

The delightful, clever and entertaining Measuring the World by Daniel Kehlmann (translated by Carol Brown Janeway) tells us the stories of two eccentric geniuses—the explorer, geographer and polymath Alexander von Humboldt and mathematician and physicist, Carl Friedrich Gauss. Our story begins in September 1828 when the German Scientific Congress is being held in Berlin, and…

Book Review: The Hangman’s Daughter by Oliver Potzsch #GermanLitMonth

The Hangman’s Daughter is the first in a series of historical mysteries set in seventeenth-century Bavaria, and combines a historical background and characters with a fictional plotline to give us an interesting but intense read. The book takes us to the town of Schongau, where Jakob Kuisl is the hangman/executioner, having taken over the job…

Book Review: Murder at the Savoy by Jim Eldridge

My thanks to Allison and Busby and NetGalley for a review copy of this book. Murder at the Savoy is the second in the Hotel Mysteries series by Jim Eldridge, set in 1940s London in the midst of the blitz. In this historical mystery, we follow Chief Inspector Coburg who is from an aristocratic background,…

Book Review: The Prince of the Skies by Antonio Iturbe

My thanks to Pan Macmillan and NetGalley for a review copy of this book. While I’ve read The Little Prince many times, and find it an endearing read, full of little nuggets of wisdom, I knew very little about its author, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, except that he was an aristocrat, a pilot, and an author…

Book Review: Wuhan by John Fletcher

My thanks to Head of Zeus and NetGalley for a review copy of this book. Wuhan is a novel of epic proportions set in the first year (1937‒1938) of the second Sino-Japanese war or Japanese invasion of China, when Wuhan (yes, the very same) served as the capital of the government headed by Chiang Kai-shek,…

Book Review: Wolf at the Door by Sarah Hawkswood

My thanks to Allison and Busby and NetGalley for a review copy of the book. Wolf at the Door is book 9 in Hawkswood’s Bradecote and Catchpoll series of mediaeval mysteries, something that I didn’t realise when requesting the book, but I am very glad I didn’t for I may have hesitated and missed out…

Shelf Control #145: The Case of the Curious Client by T.G. Campbell

Wednesday, the 28th of July, and time for Shelf Control once again! Shelf Control is a weekly feature hosted by Lisa at Bookshelf Fantasies, and celebrates the books waiting to be read on your TBR piles/mountains. To participate, all you do is pick a book from your TBR pile, and write a post about it--what…

Book Review: She Who Became the Sun by Shelley Parker-Chan

My thanks to Pan Macmillan and NetGalley for a review copy of this one. She Who Became the Sun is the first in a historical fiction/fantasy duology which builds on a historical plotline but gives it an interesting twist of its own. The story opens in mid-14th century China in a small village Zhongli, where…

Book Review: The Gilded Cage on the Bosphorus by Ayşe Osmanoğlu

My thanks to BooksgoSocial and NetGalley for a review copy of the book. Imagine living in an opulent place, with rich furnishings, delicious, decadent dishes to eat, beautiful tailored clothes in the best of fabrics to wear, your every want satisfied, a retinue of people to attend you at all hours. But also imagine, never…