Book Review: The Hollow Man by John Dickson Carr

Set in snowy London, with hints of people walking out of graves and of three coffins, links to Transylvania, two murders committed by an invisible person, and a solution I didn’t see coming at all, John Dickson Carr's The Hollow Man made for an enjoyable read, especially in this season. Our story, the sixth book…

Book Review: The Christie Affair by Nina de Gramont

My thanks to Pan Macmillan and NetGalley for a review copy of this book. Nina de Gramont weaves a rather interesting and very readable tale in The Christie Affair but while I enjoyed reading it a lot, I had some reservations which have prevented me from rating it as high as I might have otherwise.…

Book Review: A Three Book Problem by Vicki Delaney

My thanks to Crooked Lane books and NetGalley for a review copy of this book. A Three Book Problem is the seventh of a cosy mystery series, the Sherlock Holmes Bookshop Mysteries. The series centres around Gemma Doyle, a British woman who has moved to West London in the United States where she helps her…

Book Review: The Sittaford Mystery (1931) by Agatha Christie

The Sittaford Mystery (or The Murder at Hazelmoor), a standalone by the Queen of Crime, first published in 1931, is a quite perfect read for the season with a murder in a snowed-in English village difficult to navigate, a fair few suspects, and a touch of spookiness! Our story opens in the small village of…

Book Review: The Mystery of a Handsom Cab by Fergus Hume #AusReadingMonth2021

Published in 1886 (a year before Sherlock Holmes’ first appearance), The Mystery of a Handsom Cab by Fergus Hume is a murder mystery set in Melbourne of the time. While Hume was English, his family had relocated to New Zealand when he was 3, and he himself moved to Melbourne after he graduated, and worked…

Book Review: The Hangman’s Daughter by Oliver Potzsch #GermanLitMonth

The Hangman’s Daughter is the first in a series of historical mysteries set in seventeenth-century Bavaria, and combines a historical background and characters with a fictional plotline to give us an interesting but intense read. The book takes us to the town of Schongau, where Jakob Kuisl is the hangman/executioner, having taken over the job…

Book Review: The Village of Eight Graves by Seishi Yokomizo

My thanks to Pushkin Press and NetGalley for a review copy of this book. While I have read and enjoyed a fair few Japanese titles, despite all good intentions, I hadn’t gotten down to picking up any mystery title yet; this book gave me the chance to remedy that, and I enjoyed it very much…

Book Review: Death in the Stocks by Georgette Heyer

The first of the mysteries featuring Superintendent Hannasyde published in 1935 was a very enjoyable read with plenty of humour, eccentric but fun characters, sparkling dialogue, and a pretty good mystery as well. Our story opens in the village of Ashleigh Green, where Constable Dickenson is returning from night patrol. In the stocks, he spots…

Book Review: Destination Unknown by Agatha Christie

Destination Unknown, first published in 1954, is a standalone by Christie that falls firmly into her thriller category, in fact even more so than some of her other thrillers I have read/reread recently as we have no murder mystery at the start (as for instance, in The Man in the Brown Suit, They Came to…