Book Review: Tokyo Express by Seichō Matsumoto and translated by Jesse Kirkwood

My thanks to Penguin Press UK and NetGalley for a review copy of this book. Tokyo Express is a Japanese mystery/detective novel by Seichō Matsumoto, first published in 1958 and in this version, translated by Jesse Kirkwood. Having only read two of Seishi Yokomizo’s Kindaichi mysteries so far, when this showed up on NetGalley, I…

Book Review: The Housekeeper and the Professor by Yoko Ogawa and translated by Stephen Snyder

The Housekeeper and the Professor is a beautiful and poignant story of maths and numbers, of baseball, but most of all of a deep bond of friendship and affection formed between three unlikely but in their own ways lonely souls—a mathematics professor who retains old memories and has a good brain but is unable to…

Book Review: Death on Gokumon Island by Seishi Yokomizo and translated by Louise Heal Kawai

My thanks to Pushkin Press and Edelweiss for a review copy of this book. Death on Gokumon Island by Seishi Yokomizo, first published in 1971 is the fourth of Yokomizo’s mysteries to be published in translation by Pushkin Press under their Pushkin Vertigo imprint, from the series featuring his detective Kindaichi Kosuke, which has 77…

Book Review: Frenchman’s Creek by Daphne du Maurier #DDMReadingWeek

Frenchman’s Creek is a novel of romance, of adventure, of pirates and of Cornwall, and rather different from the gothic, suspense/thriller themes one usually associates with her. A novel I’d enjoyed very much on my first read years ago, this was a revisit for Ali’s #DDMReadingWeek for this year. In Frenchman’s Creek, we meet the…

Book Review: Shroud of Darkness by E.C.R. Lorac #1954Club

Shroud of Darkness, the fortieth book in the Robert Macdonald series of books by British author Edith Caroline Rivett, writing as E. C. R. Lorac was my third pick for Karen and Simon’s #1954Club. With some elements that one typically encounters in quite a few Golden Age mysteries—the London Fog and a train journey—the book…

Book Review: Madame de Pompadour by Nancy Mitford #1954Club

When Karen and Simon announced the #1954Club and I looked up options only to be bewildered by the sheer number of appealing titles published in the year, the one title I was absolutely sure I would read was Madame de Pompadour by Nancy Mitford, especially since I’d read and enjoyed her fiction but hadn’t so…

Book Review: Murder at Primrose Cottage by Merryn Allingham

My thanks to Bookouture and NetGalley for a review copy of this book. Murder in Primrose Cottage is the third in the Flora Steele series of cosy mysteries by Merryn Allingham, which I have been following from the start. While this can be read as a standalone as the mystery is complete and we get…

Book Review: Behold, Here’s Poison by Georgette Heyer

Behold, Here’s Poison (1936) is the second of Georgette Heyer’s mysteries featuring Superintendent Hannasyde; in these Hemingway, who later features in his own subset of mysteries, is Sergeant. Behold, Here’s Poison opens below-the-stairs in Poplars, where the unpleasant and domineering patriarch Gregory Matthews lives with his older sister, Harriet, widowed sister-in-law, Zoe, and Zoe’s two…

Review: Sue and Tai-Chan, Vol. 1 by Konami Kanata

My thanks to Kodansha Comics and NetGalley for a review copy of this manga. Sue and Tai-Chan is the charming first volume of the adventures of Sue a seventeen-year-old cat, and Tai-Chan, a tiny black kitten. Natsuki, Sue’s ‘human’ is handed a box with Tai-Chan a little kitten to look after. He tries to refuse,…

Review: Monkey: Vol 2: edited by Ted Goossen, Motoyuki Shibata, and Meg Taylor

My thanks to Stonebridge Press and Netgalley for a review copy of this magazine. Monkey is a literary magazine that showcases a wide range of Japanese writing translated into English. This, the second volume, edited by Ted Goossen, Motoyuki Shibata, and Meg Taylor focuses on ‘travel’. What I loved about this was its very wide…