Book Review: Lights Rains Sometimes Fall by Lev Parikian

My thanks to Elliot and Thompson and NetGalley for a review copy of this book. ‘Stop and smell the roses’ we are sometimes told or tell ourselves. Slow down, look about, and take in the beauty and wonders of life around you at all times—it isn’t just flowers, but birds, insects, bees and butterflies, trees…

Book Review: The Man Who Died Twice by Richard Osman

My thanks to Penguin UK and NetGalley for a review copy of this book. The Man Who Died Twice is the second book in the Thursday Murder Club (the Agatha Christie/Marple allusion just struck me when writing my review) series by Richard Osman. Set in a retirement village, Coopers Chase, the Thursday Murder Club comprises…

Book Review: Dr Wortle’s School by Anthony Trollope

Dr Wortle’s School (1881) is a standalone and the fortieth book written by Victorian author Anthony Trollope and focuses on themes of social propriety, gossip and justice, with an incidental thread of romance. Dr Wortle is the proprietor of a boys’ school which prepares students to go on to Eton and eventually Oxford. He is…

Book Review: Crooked House by Agatha Christie

There was a crooked man, and he walked a crooked mile…. And they all lived together in a little crooked house. Like Five Little Pigs; One, Two Buckle my Shoe (also published as The Patriotic Murders); and A Pocket Full of Rye, among many others Crooked House (1949), a standalone Christie novel too, takes inspiration…

Book Review: William of Orange and the Fight for the Crown by Brian Best

My thanks to Pen & Sword and NetGalley for a review copy of this book England in the seventeenth century saw a period fraught with religious and political tensions, the replacement of the monarchy on not one but two occasions and various changes which are reflected in the modern world. The execution of Charles I…

Book Review: Steffan Green by Richmal Crompton

Steffan Green was my first foray into Richmal Crompton’s fiction for adults, and what a wonderful read it was. As the book opens, me meet Lettice Helston, a recently divorced thirty-eight-year-old woman—in fact, she has got the decree only the previous day. Lettice is driving down to the country, to her childhood friend Dorrie—but mostly,…

Book Review: Wolf at the Door by Sarah Hawkswood

My thanks to Allison and Busby and NetGalley for a review copy of the book. Wolf at the Door is book 9 in Hawkswood’s Bradecote and Catchpoll series of mediaeval mysteries, something that I didn’t realise when requesting the book, but I am very glad I didn’t for I may have hesitated and missed out…

Book Review: Bewildering Cares by Winifred Peck

After a long time, I found myself reading a book from among my own books (the last was Daphne du Maurier’s The Breaking Point back in May for Daphne du Maurier Reading week), rather than my NetGalley pile (the only others of my own books I’ve read since have been Agatha Christies and all revisits).…

Book Review: Murder in the Village by Lisa Cutts

My thanks to Bookouture and NetGalley for a review copy of this book. In Murder in the Village, the first in the Belinda Penshurst series of mysteries, we meet Belinda Penshurt, who is a little over forty and living in her family home—the village manor/castle—in the village of Little Challham. Belinda has invested in various…

Book Review: Murder at the Seaview Hotel by Glenda Young

My thanks to Headline and NetGalley for a review copy of the book. Murder at the Seaview Hotel is the first in a cosy mystery series set in Scarborough. We meet 48-year-old Helen Dexter who has just a few months ago lost her beloved husband Tom to cancer. After having spent a couple of months…