Shelf Control #58: Bewildering Cares by Winifred Peck

Wednesday, the 4th of September, and the first shelf control post this month. Shelf Control is a weekly feature hosted by Lisa at Bookshelf Fantasies, and is about celebrating the books waiting to be read on your TBR piles/mountains. To participate, simply pick a book from your TBR pile and write a post about it. Link back to Lisa’s page, and do also leave your links in the comments below as I’d love to check out your picks.

This month again I haven’t picked a specific theme as reading has generally been slow lately because of work and such. So Shelf Control, too, once again, will be random picks from my TBR pile. This week, it’s another pick from my Kindle TBR, Bewildering Cares by Winifred Peck.

Bewildering Cares, subtitled ‘A Week in the Life of a Clergyman’s Wife’ is the diary of a vicar’s wife in a Manchester town in the early days of World War II. And before you begin to think of it as sounding dreary, it is something on the lines of the Dairy of a Provincial Lady by E.M. Delafield, so a witty and fun look at life in a small town 1940 with outraged parishioners and servant troubles, a bubbling romance or two, and the diarist’s son heading off to train with his regiment.

The Author: Lady Winifred Peck was the daughter of the fourth Bishop of Manchester, and one of an interesting set of siblings, from E.V. Knox, editor of Punch to Ronald Knox, theologian and writer, and Dilly Knox a cryptographer. The author Penelope Fitzgerald (daughter of E.V. Knox) was her niece. Peck was married to a British civil servant who was awarded a knighthood in 1938. Over a 40-year period, Peck wrote 25 novels including a couple of mysteries.

I picked this one up when it was free on offer (now it is still free on Kindle Unlimited), mostly because it sounded like Provincial Lady, and I had heard some good things about it in a Goodreads group I am part of. It certainly sounds like a delightful read.

Have you read this one or any of the author’s other books? Which ones and how did you like them? Looking forward to your thoughts!

As always information on the book and the author are from goodreads here, and here.

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Shelf Control #56: Pompeii by Robert Harris #TBR #HistoricalFiction

Wednesday the 7th of August, and time once again for Shelf Control. Shelf Control is a weekly feature hosted by Lisa at Bookshelf Fantasies, and is about celebrating the books waiting to be read on your TBR piles/mountains. To participate, simply pick a book from your TBR pile and write a post about it. Link back to Lisa’s page, and do also leave your links in the comments below as I’d love to check out your picks.

This month, I haven’t really picked a reading theme so it’s just going to be random picks from my shelves that I plan to read during the month. Likewise, Shelf Control too will have random picks that are waiting to be read on my TBR pile. This week’s pick is one such, a work of historical fiction, Pompeii by Robert Harris.

Set in the days before the eruption of Veruvius in AD 79, Pompeii takes us to the Mediterranean coast where rich Roman citizens are relaxing and enjoying themselves in their luxurious villas while the navy lies anchored peacefully. Marcus Attilius Primus, a young engineer, has taken charge of the Aqua Augusta, one of the most complex aqueduct systems in the Roman world, and one that supplies nine towns and a quarter of a million people. But he finds he has much to contend with as springs are failing for the first time in generations and his predecessor has disappeared. To repair the aqueduct, Attilius must travel to Pompeii, on the slopes of Vesuvius, where he suspects the fault to lie. But there he finds both natural and man-made dangers awaiting him.

I’ve read one other book by the author, Enigma set during World War II, and more specifically code breaking at Bletchley Park, which I enjoyed very much as it was an interesting combination of historical detail and suspense–there was a mystery and murder angle to it. Having enjoyed that one, I was looking forward to exploring other books by the author and when I spotted this one (online, second-hand), I picked it up. Life in ancient Rome is something that interests me quite a bit and I enjoy books in this setting (Rosemary Sutcliff’s books for instance, though those were in Roman England; in fact I also took a course on FutureLearn about Hadrian’s wall which explored life in Roman England). Going by my experience reading Enigma, I expect this too to combine historical events and an exciting tale, with perhaps some element of suspense.

Have you read this book or any others by Harris? Which ones and how did you find them? Any other books or series in Ancient Rome that you recommend? Looking forward to your thoughts!

All the info, as always in from wikipedia (here), and Goodreads (here).

Shelf Control #55: Superior Saturday by Garth Nix #Fantasy #TBR #Children’sLiterature

The last day of July, and the last Shelf Control for the month! Shelf Control is a weekly feature hosted by Lisa at Bookshelf Fantasies, and is about celebrating the books waiting to be read on your TBR piles/mountains (Mine is currently at 260 including all the e-books I have). To participate, simply pick a book from your TBR pile and write a post about it. Link back to Lisa’s page, and do also leave your links in the comments below as I’d love to check out your picks.

This month, in tandem with my ‘theme’ of reading sequels and next in series books, I’ve been featuring these in my Shelf Control posts as well. This week’s pick Superior Saturday by Garth Nix is book 6 in the Keys to the Kingdom series by the author. This is a fantasy-adventure series comprising seven books published between 2003 and 2010; this one appeared in 2008. Each of the books (as the name of this one suggests) is set around a day in the week. The central character is a twelve-year-old asthmatic boy named Arthur Penhaligon who lives with his large adopted family. But Arthur has been chosen to be the heir of ‘The House’–the centre of the universe. One Monday, an asthma attack brings him into contact with Mister Monday, in charge of the Lower House where he finds his true fate. Here he learns that must defeat seven trustees who represent seven deadly sins, and collect keys from each in the process. The keys are not actual keys but different objects that hold equal power and can do much of what is asked of them.

In Superior Saturday, Arthur has five of the keys, and now must face a greater challenge than any he has faced before for the sixth, as Superior Saturday is the oldest and most powerful of the trustees, and also a sorcerer with tens of thousands of sorcerers at her command. She has control of the Upper House, and has been the one plotting against Arthur all along. Alongside, his home city is under attack, and he can’t rely on his allies.

This was a book I randomly picked up from the shop-soiled section at my neighbourhood bookshop since it sounded like fun. I haven’t read any of the others in the series (or any other by the author), and while the world sounds a little complicated to may be understand from a later point in the series, I’d still like to give it a try. Besides the story, what sounds interesting about the series are the literary and mythological references/allusions sprinkled all through, including Arthur himself (Penhaligon/Pendragon).

The Author: Garth Nix is a children’s and young-adult fantasy author from Australia, known for the Old Kingdom, Keys to the Kingdom, and Seventh Towers series. He has also written various standalone novels for children as well as some works for adults as well.

Have you read this series before or any other books by Garth Nix? Which one/s and how did you find them? Do you enjoy books with literary references and allusions? Which are some of your favourites (books or series)? Looking forward to your thoughts!

As always, info on the book, series, and author is from Goodreads, and Wikipedia, here, here, here and here.

Shelf Control #54: Harding’s Luck by Edith Nesbit #TBR #ChildrensLiterature

Wednesday the 24th of July–it’s Shelf Control time once again! Shelf Control is a weekly feature hosted by Lisa at Bookshelf Fantasies, and is all about the books waiting to be read on your TBR piles/mountains (Mine is currently at 260 including all the e-books I have). To participate, simply pick a book from your TBR pile and write a post about it. Link back to Lisa’s page, and do also leave your links in the comments below as I’d love to check out your picks!

This week, once again continuing with featuring sequels or next in series books that wait on my TBR, my pick is a children’s book–Harding’s Luck by Edith Nesbit. First published in 1909, this is the sequel to The House of Arden published a year earlier, the two books forming a series called the Fabian Time Fantasies (This is according to Goodreads, Wikipedia simply calls the series The House of Arden series). The House of Arden featured two children Edred and Elfrida, who with their aunt are the last of the Ardens, and live in a crumbling castle. Eldred inherits the title and also learns that if he manages to locate the missing (for generations) family fortune before his tenth birthday, it will be his. They meet a magical creature, the mouldiwarp, with whom the travel through time (into the past mostly) to trace the treasure. There they get into a fair few scrapes, at times (for instance, in the Gunpowder plot) because they seem to know what will occur before it has actually happened. I read this book some years ago, and enjoyed it enough to look for the sequel. (I don’t remember the details so much now.) I downloaded a copy of this via Project Gutenberg (here).

Harding’s Luck, the book I’m actually featuring, is the story of young Dickie Harding, a poor lame boy who lives in a back street in London. (He was a minor character in book 1.) One day, on planting some (I guess) magic seeds he finds growing a moonflower, which he attempts to exchange for his silver rattle which his aunt had had to pawn. This begins his adventures, as soon enough he is transported back in time by mouldiwarps to awake as Richard Arden. But the time travel doesn’t start immediately for Dickie does have some adventures in the present before this, being forced into begging and theft.

I’ve read very mixed reviews of this one, some liking it quite a bit, others criticising it for reasons including a not very strong link to the first book, as well as on Dickie’s character being much too ‘good’ and sacrificing. But anyway, having enjoyed the first book (and plenty of Nesbit’s other books), I’d still like to give this one a try.

Edith Nesbit
via wikimedia commons

The Author: Edith Nesbit (who wrote as E. Nesbit) was an English author and poet, who wrote over 60 children’s books including the Pssamead Books, and the Treasure Seekers or Bastable books, and The Railway Children to name a few. She has also written novels and story collections for adults, besides poetry. She was also a political activist and co-founder of the Fabian society.

Have you read this book? How did you like it if you did? What about other works by the author? Any favourites which you’d like to recommend? Looking forward to your thoughts!

My info on Nesbit comes from Wikipedia as usual: here.

On the book: Goodreads of course (here), also a couple of blogs: here, here and here.

Shelf Control #53: Death of a Pig in a Poke by Matthew Hole #Mystery

Wednesday, the 17th of July–Shelf Control time! Shelf Control is a weekly feature hosted by Lisa at Bookshelf Fantasies, and is all about the books waiting to be read on your TBR piles/mountains (Mine is currently at 261 including all the e-books I’ve downloaded). To participate, simply pick a book from your TBR pile and write a post about it. Link back to Lisa’s page, and do also leave your links in the comments below as I’d love to check out your picks!

This month I’m reading sequels and next in series books, and those are also what I’m featuring (as far as possible) in my Shelf Control posts as well. This week’s pick is a mystery (yet again, my first Shelf Control this month was one too (here)), Death of a Pig in a Poke by Matthew Hole. This is book 2 in the Tarricone Murder Mystery series of which so far as I can see, there are only two as of now. The series features Tarricone and Son, probate researchers. There is also Tarricone’s ‘wily’ aunt Nelly. The first book was set in Agatha Christie’s country house ‘Greenway’ in Devon.

This book, published in 2014, sees Tarricone rushing off to Spyte Manor when Lady Clemency Breeze climbs uninvited into (or perhaps, breezes into) the back of his taxi in London. This leads Tarricone into a murder investigation where there is obviously a corpse, but also a vanishing gardener and a labyrinth in a garden. To add to it, the local detective inspector, it seems, has an agenda of her own. This one has been described by goodreads reviewers as a mix of a classic and new mystery, with plenty of twists.

I picked up this and the first title in the series last year I think, both on kindle when they were available for free. Mysteries are of course one of my favourite genres to read, and Agatha Christie one of my favourite writers in that genre (when it comes to the actual puzzles, there are few who can beat her, and she gets me every time–almost), so when I spotted these (someone mentioned them in a book group on Goodreads) mysteries which are inspired by and set on the lines of Christie’s books, I picked them up. There aren’t very many reviews of this series or much about the author anywhere though, so I will be diving in blind so to speak.

The first book in the series

Have you read either of the books in this series? How did you find it/them? A good, gripping mystery or just ok? Or do you plan to read this or the first book? Looking forward to your thoughts!

The description and cover images as usual are from Goodreads.

Shelf Control #52: The Second Common Reader by Virginia Woolf

Wednesday, the 10th of July–Shelf Control day again! Shelf Control is a weekly feature hosted by Lisa at Bookshelf Fantasies, and celebrates the books waiting to be read on your TBR piles/mountains (Mine is currently at 262 including all the e-books I’ve downloaded). To participate, simply pick a book from your TBR pile and write a post about it. Link back to Lisa’s page, and do also leave your links in the comments below as I’d love to check out your picks!

This month I’m focusing on reading next in series books and sequels waiting to be read on my TBR pile for the most part (July plans here), and so my Shelf Control posts too will feature some sequels or books from series other than book one, which are waiting on my TBR. This week’s pick is The Second Common Reader or The Common Reader: Second Series by Virginia Woolf.

The Common Reader: Second Series is a sequel of sorts to Woolf’s The Common Reader: First Series, and like this first is a collection of literary essays focusing on specific books, writers, poetry, and more generally on reading and its pleasures. Among others, this volume talks of the Elizabethans, Donne, Swift, Robinson Crusoe, De Quincey, Thomas Hardy, Mary Woolstonecraft, George Gissing, and Beau Brummel. This collection of twenty-six essays ends with Woolf’s reflections on ‘How to Read a Book’?

I read the first volume of her essays some years ago, and really enjoyed them. She talked of books and authors I knew like Jane Austen, George Eliot, the Brontes and Conrad as well as those new to me like Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle who’s point of view, albeit a touch eccentric, was one that interested me very much and made me want to look her and her writings up immediately. I also enjoyed reading Woolf’s views on these works, and on, in some cases, the circumstances in which the writers may or may not have written, their inspirations, and such, but mostly because (while she may have not been a ‘common’ reader), it is essentially the thoughts of a reader (and one reading at least some of the books that you do), and one certainly always enjoys reading those!

Since I enjoyed the first series so much, I picked up the second (downloaded via fadedpage.com), and am looking forward to some new insights into authors I’ve read before (and how it would impact my revisits), and certainly to discovering ‘new’ ones who I haven’t?

Have you read any of Virginia Woolf’s essays? How did you find them? And how about her books? Any you like or dislike? Which ones? Looking forward to your thoughts!

From fellow bloggers:

A peek into Woolf’s Writing Lodge and images of her bookshelves: https://calmgrove.wordpress.com/2018/11/10/woolf/

A review of her book Flush (one of my favourites, based on and written from the point of view of Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s dog): https://wordpress.com/read/blogs/110620162/posts/11157

Shelf Control #51: Naked Heat by Richard Castle #Mystery #Detective #Castle

Wednesday, the 3rd of July–Shelf Control time once again! Shelf Control is a weekly feature hosted by Lisa at Bookshelf Fantasies, and celebrates the books waiting to be read on your TBR piles/mountains (Mine is currently at 263 including all the e-books I’ve downloaded). To participate, simply pick a book from your TBR pile and write a post about it. Link back to Lisa’s page, and do also leave your links in the comments below as I’d love to check out your picks!

New month, new theme. Last month I’d simply been featuring random picks from my TBR pile in Shelf Control; this time (June review and July plans yet to be posted–probably this weekend) I plan to pick up sequels and series (books other than the first) that are on my TBR, and so for Shelf Control too, I’ll be featuring books from series or sequels. This week’s pick as you can see is Naked Heat by Richard Castle.

This is the second in the ‘Nikki Heat’ series of books by Richard Castle, which I’m sure you know are tied-in with the TV series Castle (wiki here). The book series features NYPD detective Nikki Heat and Jamison Rook a journalist who is following her (with permission from the Commissioner) for research on an article. Working with them are Detectives Ochoa and Raley. The characters are all based on characters from the TV series–Detective Kate Beckett, Richard Castle, and Ryan and Esposito. Other characters like Margaret Rook (Jameson’s mother) and the medical examiner Lauren Parry are also based on Martha Roger’s (Castle’s mother, and ME Lanie Parish from the show, respectively).

In this one, an infamous gossip columnist is stabbed in the back in a case involving a Yankees pitcher, an actor, and a pop star. Heat and Rook investigate.

Richard Castle (Nathan Fillion)
(Source: Goodreads)

I’m not sure who actually wrote these books but the Nikki Heat series (10 books) and Derrick Storm series (5 books) are both supposed to have been written by the TV character Richard Castle (who is a detective story writer in the show), and it is his picture and fictional bio that appear on the books (and on Goodreads-here).

I really liked the TV show for the most part (when they shift focus from Beckett’s mother’s mystery to Castle’s father, I lost a bit of interest)–I enjoyed the plots and mysteries, especially the fact that there were plenty of twists and turns and some witty dialogue as well. Added to this Castle and his family are likeable characters–clever and fun. From what I’ve heard (I haven’t read any yet), the books are pretty good and read like episodes from the show, and if that’s the case, I think they will be enjoyable reads for me. This one I picked up on kindle (last year, I think) when it was on sale. Looking forward to a fun read.

Are you a fan of the show Castle? Have you read any of the books in the series or any of the Derrick Storm books? Which ones and how did you like them? Looking forward to your thoughts!

All the information on the book, TV series, and author is from Goodreads and wikipedia as always.

Shelf Control #50: And Berry Came Too by Dornford Yates #Humour

Wednesday, June 26–time again for Shelf Control! The last one this month–time certainly is flying. Shelf Control is a weekly feature hosted by Lisa at Bookshelf Fantasies, and celebrates the books waiting to be read on your TBR piles/mountains (Mine is currently at 266 including all the e-books I’ve downloaded). To participate, just pick a book from your TBR pile and write a post about it. Link back to Lisa’s page, and do also leave your links in the comments below as I’d love to check out your picks!

This month I’ve simply been picking random books from my TBR pile to write about in this feature, and this week’s pick is a collection of connected short stories, And Berry Came Too by Dornford Yates.

And Berry Came Too (1936) is book six in the ‘Berry’ series of books by Yates. These are more or less (with the exception I think of Adele and Co) collections of connected short stories featuring the Pleydell family–Berry and his wife Daphne, her brother Boy and his wife Adele, their cousins Jonah and Jill. Along the line Jill marries Piers, Duke of Padua who joins the group. In the initial stories, they are also joined by a Sealyham Nobby, but he wasn’t there in the last one I read. The group is more often than not falling into various ridiculous adventures, sometimes tracking down thieves and criminals or stolen goods, getting stuck with contraband, or getting away from angry gendarmes. Their adventures are for the most part hilarious, but there is sometimes a touch of drama and also a little romance. [The books are set in the post World War I period, and Berry, Jonah and Boy have all been in the army. Shadows of this appear off and on, but the tone of the books is light-hearted for the most part.] Interwoven in the books are beautiful descriptions of nature, and at times, also of towns and cities, reading which not only takes one amidst the scene being described but which also bring one the sense of peace that one feels when in those surroundings.

I have quoted this one before earlier on this page, but from Berry and Co.

As was fitting, St. George’s Day dawned fair and cloudless. Her passionate weeping of the day before dismissed, April was smiling—shyly at first, as if uncertain that her recent waywardness had been forgiven, and by and by so bravely that all the sweet o’ the year rose up out of the snowy orchards, dewy and odorous, danced in the gleaming meadows and hung, glowing and breathless, in every swaying nursery that Spring had once more built upon the patient trees.

Dornford Yates, Berry and Co (1920)

Back to this book now, this is a series of eight stories, described as ‘the hair-raising adventures and idiotic situations of the Pleydell family’ (from the description of Goodreads/Fadedpage). The description doesn’t give any further details but if they are like the earlier books in the series, I know I will have a good laugh or rather many good laughs reading them. Berry’s conversations and even his letters are simply hilarious, and this is sure to have some of those. (I have an e-copy, by the way, downloaded via fadedpage.com).

Cecil William Mercer
by George Charles Beresford via wikimedia commons

Cecil William Mercer (1885-1960) was an English novelist, who wrote under the pen name Dornford Yates (a combination of the maiden names of his grandmothers). He wrote both comic novels (the Berry series) as well as thrillers–among them the Chandos series in which Jonah (Jonathan Mansell) appears as a main character in a different avatar, and standalone books. I have read four of the Berry books so far which I enjoyed very much, and one of the Chandos series which was enjoyable but I didn’t like how he’d changed the relationship equations between the Berry characters (who appear in that book as well–not the entire series though).

Have you read any books by Yates before? Which one/s and how did you like them? Looking forward to your thoughts!

Shelf Control #49: Diabolic Candelabra by E.R. Punshon #Mystery #TBR #GoldenAge

Wednesday, June 19–time again for Shelf Control! Shelf Control is a weekly feature hosted by Lisa at Bookshelf Fantasies, and celebrates the books waiting to be read on your TBR piles/mountains. To participate, just pick a book from your TBR pile and write a post about it. Link back to Lisa’s page, and do also leave your links in the comments below as I’d love to check out your picks!

This month as I wrote before (last week’s post here), I’m simply featuring random picks from my TBR pile in Shelf Control rather than picking books around my monthly reading ‘theme’ as I usually do since I this month, I’m trying to catch up with reads left over from previous months, and haven’t picked a theme as such. So this week’s pick is another such book, a golden age mystery in fact–Diabolic Candelabra by E.R. Punshon.

Diabolic Candelabra (1942) is the seventeenth in a series of thirty-five mysteries featuring Bobby Owen, who works his way up from police constable to Commander at Scotland Yard over the course of the series. In this one, Inspector Owen’s wife Olive is on the hunt for a recipe for chocolates. But where Owen is concerned, a simple hunt for a chocolate recipe doesn’t as expected remain that. Instead into the recipe are added a wood-dwelling hermit, a girl who talks to animals, an evil stepfather, and two very valuable works of art–of course, a recipe not for chocolate but murder! Described as a ‘beguiling story of labyrinths and seemingly impossible murder’ which is a ‘treat for armchair sleuths’.

I picked this one up (with a couple of others in the series) a few months ago when it was free on Kindle. Having never tried Punshon’s books before, I thought that was a good chance to. As far as this specific story is concerned, I like the description–a recipe for ‘uncommonly good’ chocolates which turns into a complicated puzzle, and that too, a Golden Age mystery–just my cup of tea!

E.R. (Ernest Robertson) Punshon (1872-1956) was an English novelist and literary critic, most successful in the 1930s and 1940s. He is best known today as the creator of Bobby Owen; the series featuring Owen was published between 1933 and 1956. Punshon also wrote crime and horror short stories, and was reviewer for many of Agatha Christie’s books in the Guardian when they were first published. Find a full list of his works here.

Do you enjoy Golden Age mysteries? Which ones or which authors are your favourites? Have you read Punshon before–this book or any other/s? How did you find them? Looking forward to your thoughts!

All descriptions are from Goodreads and wikipedia, as always.

Shelf Control #48: Passion by Jude Morgan #HistoricalFiction #Poetry

Wednesday, June 12–Shelf Control time again! Shelf Control is a weekly feature hosted by Lisa at Bookshelf Fantasies, and celebrates the books waiting to be read on your TBR piles/mountains. To participate, simply pick a book from your TBR pile and write a post about it–when and where you got it, what makes you want to read it, and such. Link back to Lisa’s page, and do also leave your links in the comments below as I’d love to check out your picks!

This month, as I mentioned last week also, I don’t have a specific reading theme and am only catching up with books I have left over from my TBRs for the past couple of months. So for Shelf Control, too I am simply picking random books to feature from my TBR shelf. This week’s pick as you can see from the cover is Passion (2004) by Jude Morgan.

Images: Shelley, Keats, and Byron.

Historical fiction once again, this one is set in the years of the French Revolution and Napoleonic Wars, and around the lives of three romantic poets–Percy Bysshe Shelley, Lord Byron, and John Keats. The three come in to prominence, becoming famous or infamous for their lives as much as for their works. This book explores their stories through the stories of four women in their lives–the gifted Mary Shelley, aristocratic Lady Caroline Lamb, quiet Fanny Brawne, and Augusta Leigh–who themselves flout many conventions in loving them. Told from different perspectives, the book explores the intense tempestuous lives of these men and women, and at 663 pages (Review books 2004) is quite the tome.

Images: (clockwise) Mary Shelley, Caroline Lamb, Fanny Brawne, and Augusta Leigh

Jude Morgan was born and brought up in Peterborough on the edge of the Fens, and studied Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia. Among his books are The Secret Life of William Shakespeare (2014), The King’s Touch (2003) focusing on Charles II, and Symphony (2007) about composer Hector Belioz.

Last year, I was reading The Lost Art of Keeping Secrets by Eva Rice, a book set in 1950s England (which reminded me very much of I Capture the Castle, and which I very much enjoyed; review here). Anyway, at the back of the book was a description of Passion, a book I’d not heard of before but reading the blurb I knew this was one I wanted to read. So I looked it up online and ordered a copy (second hand) as soon as it showed up.

Having just read a bio of the Shelleys in graphic novel form (reviews here and here), and enjoyed poems and other writings by Shelley, Keats, and Byron, and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, at different times, this is of course a book I am very much looking forward to reading. Once again, I would love to see how the author has recreated the time at Villa Diodati where Frankenstein was created. I have never read anything by Morgan before nor any serious account of these three poets’ lives, other than bits and pieces here and there, so this would also be a chance for me to get a picture of their lives.

Villa Diodati
via wikimedia commons

Have you read this book before or anything else by this author? How did you like it? If you haven’t, would you want to read it? Any favourite poems or writings of Keats, Byron, and/or Shelley? Looking forward to your thoughts!

The descriptions of the book are from Goodreads and the blurb at the back of the book; of Morgan from Goodreads, and all images are from wikimedia commons.