Book Review: Ti Amo by Hanne Ørstavik and translated by Martin Aitken #NovNov

My thanks to Archipelago/Steerforth Press for a review copy of this book via Edelweiss. Ti Amo (2022) is a raw, honest, beautiful, heart-breaking, autobiographical account of a woman whose husband is suffering terminal cancer. Written originally in Norwegian by author Hanne Ørstavik, the version I read is translated brilliantly by Martin Aitken. In Ti Amo,…

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Book Review: Dead in the Water by Mark Ellis

My thanks to the author Mark Ellis for a review copy of the book via Booktasters. Dead in the Water is the fifth in the Frank Merlin series of police procedurals/mysteries set in World-War-II London. I have previously read and reviewed the first in this series but haven’t yet had chance to catch up with…

Book Review: How We Disappear: novella and stories by Tara Lynn Masih

My thanks to Press 53 for a review copy of this book via NetGalley. Having read and loved Tara Lynn Masih’s novel My Real Name is Hanna (a piece of historical fiction that I highly recommend), when I saw this collection of short stories on NetGalley, I of course had to read it. How We…

Book Review: Montaigne by Stefan Zweig and translated by Will Stone #NovNov #NonfictionNovember #GermanLitMonth

In such epochs where the highest values of life—our peace, our independence, our basic rights, all that makes our existence more pure, more beautiful, all that justifies it—are sacrificed to the demon inhabiting a dozen fanatics and ideologues, all the problems of the man who fears for his humanity come down to the same question:…

Book Review: Passing (1929) by Nella Larsen #NovNov

Passing (1929) by Nella Larsen, written and set during the Harlem renaissance, is a complex novel, which as its name suggests, navigates themes of race and identity which form a central thread in the book but also much more, for themes of marriage and relationships are also key, besides others like motherhood, class and society.…

Book Review: Over Sea, Under Stone by Susan Cooper #TDiRS22

As I wrote in a previous post this week as well, I seem to be running on my own schedule on book challenges and memes I’m joining in, with work commitments having set my reading plans awry. So I’m only just getting to my review of Over Sea, Under Stone (1965), the first in Susan…

Book Review: Chandrakanta: A Hindi Fantasy Classic by Devaki Nandan Khatri (translated by Rohini Chowdhury)

Today I am sharing my thoughts on the Hindi fantasy classic Chandrakanta (1888) by Devaki Nandan Khatri, which first appeared this past Friday as part of #WitchWeek2022 hosted by Chris at Calmgrove, and Lizzie at Lizzie Ross Writer, here. Below is the post as appeared on Chris' blog. * * * A beautiful princess, a…

Book Review: The Poppy War by R. F. Kuang

The Poppy War is the first in a historical–fantasy trilogy, based on the second Sino-Japanese war but with a fictional setting and characters. In the kingdom of Nikara, in the southern Rooster province lives a young orphan Rin in a small village Tikany. Her parents, dead, she is being brought up by foster parents, the…

Book Review: Paying Guests by E. F. Benson #1929Club

Paying Guests by author, biographer, and memoirist E. F. Benson, first published in 1929, is a standalone novel, which appeared in publication order somewhere between his best-known Mapp and Lucia books. This story is set in the fictional Bolton Spa and around Wentworth, a boarding house which is far more elegant and luxurious than others,…

Guest Post: Book Review: The Black Camel by Earl Derr Biggers #1929club

Today, I have my mother's second pick, The Black Camel by Earl Derr Biggers. * * * Fourth in a series of six novels featuring the rotund Chinese detective, Charlie Chan, the pride of the Honolulu police, The Black Camel explores the world of Hollywood stars, theatre actors and their millionaire, and other not so…