Book Review: Paying Guests by E. F. Benson #1929Club

Paying Guests by author, biographer, and memoirist E. F. Benson, first published in 1929, is a standalone novel, which appeared in publication order somewhere between his best-known Mapp and Lucia books. This story is set in the fictional Bolton Spa and around Wentworth, a boarding house which is far more elegant and luxurious than others,…

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Book Review: Mrs R. Snugglesworth, Attorney-at-Law by Amy Flanagan

26 August is International Dog Day, and what better way to celebrate than review a book featuring a dog? Well, reviewing a book featuring a dog who’s an attorney of course! Mrs R. Snugglesworth, Attorney-at-Law by Amy Flanagan and illustrated by Jon Davis is an imaginative and fun little children’s title which can be enjoyed…

Book Review: The Martins by David Foenkinos and translated by Sam Taylor

My thanks to Gallic Books/Consortium Book Sales and Distribution and Edelweiss for a review copy of this book. The Martins is a French novel by author David Foenkinos and translated by Sam Taylor which takes us on an amusing journey with an author writing a book. In the book, our narrator an author, accustomed to…

Guest Post: Book Review: Jeeves and the Feudal Spirit by P.G. Wodehouse #1954Club

Today I'm sharing my mother's second pick for Karen and Simon's #1954Club, Jeeves and the Feudal Spirit by P. G. Wodehouse. As a child, I often heard my sister laugh out loud when reading a Wodehouse. I did try one, but didn’t find it very amusing. It was only as an adult that I learnt…

Book Review: Diary of a Buddhist Cat by Julian Worker

My thanks to BooksGoSocial and NetGalley for a review copy of this book. Diary of a Buddhist Cat is a delightful, humorous and entertaining read which I absolutely loved. This was the second of my recent reads to be narrated by a cat! Freddie is a three-year-old black-and-white tom who is adopted from a shelter…

Book Review: Measuring the World by Daniel Kehlmann #GermanLitMonth

The delightful, clever and entertaining Measuring the World by Daniel Kehlmann (translated by Carol Brown Janeway) tells us the stories of two eccentric geniuses—the explorer, geographer and polymath Alexander von Humboldt and mathematician and physicist, Carl Friedrich Gauss. Our story begins in September 1828 when the German Scientific Congress is being held in Berlin, and…

Book Review: Death in the Stocks by Georgette Heyer

The first of the mysteries featuring Superintendent Hannasyde published in 1935 was a very enjoyable read with plenty of humour, eccentric but fun characters, sparkling dialogue, and a pretty good mystery as well. Our story opens in the village of Ashleigh Green, where Constable Dickenson is returning from night patrol. In the stocks, he spots…

Centenary Post: Book Review: The Case of the Gilded Fly by Edmund Crispin

2 October 2021 marks the 100th birthday of Robert Bruce Montgomery, composer and writer, who wrote detective stories under the pseudonym Edmund Crispin, and musical scores including for the early films in the Carry On series. To celebrate, I read The Case of the Gilded Fly (1944), the first book to feature Crispin’s detective, Oxford…

Book Review: Cat Flap by Alan S. Cowell

My thanks to Agora Books and NetGalley for a review copy of this book. Cat Flap is a slightly fantastical, quirky, humorous but also slightly over the top novel. Successful corporate executive, Dolores Tremayne, finds part of herself in her family’s cat, X (named so by her daughter, since it sounds ‘mysterious’) while her human…

Book Review: Bewildering Cares by Winifred Peck

After a long time, I found myself reading a book from among my own books (the last was Daphne du Maurier’s The Breaking Point back in May for Daphne du Maurier Reading week), rather than my NetGalley pile (the only others of my own books I’ve read since have been Agatha Christies and all revisits).…