Centenary Post: Book Review: The Case of the Gilded Fly by Edmund Crispin

2 October 2021 marks the 100th birthday of Robert Bruce Montgomery, composer and writer, who wrote detective stories under the pseudonym Edmund Crispin, and musical scores including for the early films in the Carry On series. To celebrate, I read The Case of the Gilded Fly (1944), the first book to feature Crispin’s detective, Oxford…

Book Review: Cat Flap by Alan S. Cowell

My thanks to Agora Books and NetGalley for a review copy of this book. Cat Flap is a slightly fantastical, quirky, humorous but also slightly over the top novel. Successful corporate executive, Dolores Tremayne, finds part of herself in her family’s cat, X (named so by her daughter, since it sounds ‘mysterious’) while her human…

Book Review: Bewildering Cares by Winifred Peck

After a long time, I found myself reading a book from among my own books (the last was Daphne du Maurier’s The Breaking Point back in May for Daphne du Maurier Reading week), rather than my NetGalley pile (the only others of my own books I’ve read since have been Agatha Christies and all revisits).…

Book Review: Death and Croissants by Ian Moore

My thanks to Farrago Books and NetGalley for a review copy of this book. Death and Croissants is the first of the Follet Valley Mysteries and is a crazy, quirky, comic, and slightly over the top cosy mystery. In the book, we meet Richard Ainsworth, a middle-aged Englishman who has moved to the bucolic Loire…

Book Review: The Semi-detached House by Emily Eden

Over April and May I revisited Emily Eden’s The Semi-detached House with a Goodreads group. This is Eden’s second novel, though published first in 1859. Emily Eden (1797–1869) was born into an aristocratic family (her father William Eden, 1st Baron Auckland was a diplomat and politician (also author of a book on Penal Law) while…

Book Review: A Case of Blackmail in Belgravia by Clara Benson

A Case of Blackmail in Belgravia (2016) is the first of a series of five books (so far) featuring Freddie Pilkington-Soames and set in 1920s–1930s London (at least the first is in London). Freddie was first introduced in another series by the author, the Angela Marchmont mysteries some of which I’ve read and enjoyed very…

Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone: Dumbledore Humour #Humour #Quotes #HarryPotter

Albus Dumbledore, Order of Merlin First Class, Grand Sorc., Chief Warlock, Supreme Mugwump, International Confed. Of Wizards, Headmaster of Hogwarts, school of Witchcraft and Wizardry is one of the greatest wizards there is. Dumbledore could have been Minister of Magic but preferred to be at Hogwarts. He is the only one He-who-must-not-be-named is afraid of,…

Book Review: Lucia’s Progress by E.F. Benson

Lucia’s Progress is book 5 in Benson’s Mapp and Lucia series, telling of the further adventures of Emmeline Lucas, ‘Lucia’, as she pits her wits against her arch-rival Elizabeth Mapp-Flint (now married to major Benjy) to be ‘queen’ of Tilling. As this instalment opens, Lucia is about to turn fifty and realises that while she…

Book Review: Mapp and Lucia by Edward Frederic Benson

The fourth of the Mapp and Lucia series and the book in which the two ladies first cross swords (we are told that they have met earlier, when Miss Mapp visited and stayed a short while in Riseholme, and from where, we learn some of her contributions to Tilling society like ‘Au Reservoir’ actually came).…