Book Review: Over Sea, Under Stone by Susan Cooper #TDiRS22

As I wrote in a previous post this week as well, I seem to be running on my own schedule on book challenges and memes I’m joining in, with work commitments having set my reading plans awry. So I’m only just getting to my review of Over Sea, Under Stone (1965), the first in Susan…

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Book Review: The Legend of Sally Jones by Jakob Wegelius and translated by Peter Graves; illustrated by Jakob Wegelius

My thanks to Pushkin Press/Steerforth Press for a review copy of the book vie Edelweiss. Sally Jones is a gorilla (at times dressed in overalls) who serves with her friend the chief engineer aboard a ship, and moves comfortably among humans. In Wegelius’s The Murderer’s Ape, Sally must begin a harrowing quest when the Chief…

Book Review: Mrs R. Snugglesworth, Attorney-at-Law by Amy Flanagan

26 August is International Dog Day, and what better way to celebrate than review a book featuring a dog? Well, reviewing a book featuring a dog who’s an attorney of course! Mrs R. Snugglesworth, Attorney-at-Law by Amy Flanagan and illustrated by Jon Davis is an imaginative and fun little children’s title which can be enjoyed…

Book Review: The Little Captain by Paul Biegel, translated by Gillian Hume and Paul Biegel and illustrated by Sally Collins

My thanks to Pushkin Press and Edelweiss for a review copy of this book. I have been enjoying exploring Pushkin Press’s vast and interesting list of translated literature from different parts of the globe, and from its children’s catalogue have found especially fun titles from Dutch children’s fiction. I’ve read and loved titles by Tonke…

Book Review: The Game with No Name by L. G. Cunningham

My thanks to the author L.G. Cunningham for a review copy of this book vis BookTasters. The Game with No Name is an imaginative, entertaining and fun children’s (or more specifically middle-grade) horror–fantasy–adventure, likely inspired by Jumanji, but also its own story. In The Game with No Name, twins (not identical) Isabella ‘Izzy’ and Noah…

Book Review: The Magician’s Nephew by C.S. Lewis #Narniathon21

The penultimate book in the Narniad, The Magician’s Nephew (1955), like the previous entry in the series, The Horse and His Boy takes a leap back in time, but a much larger leap, all the way to the beginning, before there ever was a Narnia. (This post might be slightly spoilery for the book). Young…

Book Review: A World Full of Nature Stories: 50 Folk Tales and Legends by Angela McAllister (author) and Hannah Bess Ross (illustrator)

My thanks to the Quarto Group and Edelweiss for a review copy of the book. A World Full of Nature Stories: 50 Folktales and Legends is a beautiful collection of traditional stories, folk tales, and legends from pretty much every corner of the globe, and all of which are centred on different aspects of nature—be…

Book Review: The Horse and His Boy by C.S. Lewis #Narniathon21

The fifth of the Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis, The Horse and His Boy (1954), unlike the previous instalments in the series takes a leap back in time, in fact, to a point when the Pevensie children are ruling Narnia, and while connected with Narnia and the world that we’ve been following so far,…

Book Review: The Wheel on the School by Meindert DeJong #1954Club

But I don’t know much about storks, because storks never come to Shora. This is my second pick for Karen and Simon’s #1954Club. Children’s literature is a genre I always enjoy, especially because much of it has elements owe can appreciate as an adult as well, giving it so many layers, and so much depth.…

Guest Post: Book Review: Good Work, Secret Seven by Enid Blyton #1954Club

Today, we have my mother's third pick for the #1954Club, Good Work, Secret Seven by Enid Blyton! If you were a child in the fifties and sixties, Enid Blyton’s child detective series would have been an essential part of your existence. The Five Findouters and Buster, the Famous Five and Timmy, the Barney “R” Mysteries…