Book Review: Always Gardenia (2018) by Betsy Hanson

My thanks to the author Betsy Hanson for taking the trouble to mail copy of this book all the way to me (and a very lovely one it is), and also to Ali from Heavenali for putting me in touch with Betsy. Always Gardenia (2018) transports readers to the charming, gentle, and yet very real…

Advertisement

Book Review: The Legend of Sally Jones by Jakob Wegelius and translated by Peter Graves; illustrated by Jakob Wegelius

My thanks to Pushkin Press/Steerforth Press for a review copy of the book vie Edelweiss. Sally Jones is a gorilla (at times dressed in overalls) who serves with her friend the chief engineer aboard a ship, and moves comfortably among humans. In Wegelius’s The Murderer’s Ape, Sally must begin a harrowing quest when the Chief…

Book Review: Mrs R. Snugglesworth, Attorney-at-Law by Amy Flanagan

26 August is International Dog Day, and what better way to celebrate than review a book featuring a dog? Well, reviewing a book featuring a dog who’s an attorney of course! Mrs R. Snugglesworth, Attorney-at-Law by Amy Flanagan and illustrated by Jon Davis is an imaginative and fun little children’s title which can be enjoyed…

Book Review: The Familiars by Stacey Halls

Lancashire 1612: The trial of the ‘Pendle witches’, twelve accused living around Pendle Hill in Lancashire at the time, most from two families the Devices and Chattoxes who apparently also made allegations against each other, besides others including one Alice Grey. The group was alleged to be responsible for the deaths of 10 people through…

Book Review: Father Goose by William Lishman

I had received Father Goose (1995) by William Lishman as a present many years ago, but despite it being about a rather interesting person and subject, I never somehow got down to reading it. But this year, having added it to my #10BooksofSummer list, I finally did. Father Goose is an autobiographical account of William…

Book Review: The Dragonfly Pool by Eva Ibbotson

A school story, a Ruritanian adventure, a story rich in nature, a story about friendship and about family, about World War II and standing up to the Nazis, and also about freedom—The Dragonfly Pool (2008) is all of these—a strange seeming combination perhaps, but one that works rather well. In The Dragonfly Pool, we meet…

International Cat Day 2022: Some Feline Detectives

It's the 8th of August 2022, International Cat Day, so of course, its time for a catty post! Well, not just a catty post, but a cats and books post (Literary Potpourri is after all home to Keli Cat's Book Corner). Cats of course have become quite a regular feature in mystery and detective fiction,…

Book Review: The Little Captain by Paul Biegel, translated by Gillian Hume and Paul Biegel and illustrated by Sally Collins

My thanks to Pushkin Press and Edelweiss for a review copy of this book. I have been enjoying exploring Pushkin Press’s vast and interesting list of translated literature from different parts of the globe, and from its children’s catalogue have found especially fun titles from Dutch children’s fiction. I’ve read and loved titles by Tonke…

Book Review: The Last Battle by C.S. Lewis #Narniathon21

Having fallen rather behind on my reading, I only got down to reading and putting down my thoughts on the final Narnia novel, The Last Battle (1956) rather late. While I had read the other six Narnia books earlier (some more than once), this was my first time reading The Last Battle and it was…

Book Review: The Magician’s Nephew by C.S. Lewis #Narniathon21

The penultimate book in the Narniad, The Magician’s Nephew (1955), like the previous entry in the series, The Horse and His Boy takes a leap back in time, but a much larger leap, all the way to the beginning, before there ever was a Narnia. (This post might be slightly spoilery for the book). Young…